Thursday, April 30, 2009

Tarleton Thursdays: Did You Know?

Book Return in the New Library
The May 7, 1957 J-TAC showed the photo above and stated: "OUTSIDE CHUTE - Returning books through the outside chute to the left of the main entrance of the Tarleton Library are, left to right, Virginia Winkler of Belton, Gloria Grohmann of Austin, and Gloria Ratliff of Haskell. As of April 5 there had been 1,351 books checked out of the library."
The Twentieth Century Club, whose president was Louise Linn Bramlette, wife of Tarleton's president E.E. Bramlette, held a book reception in January 1902 to benefit the John Tarleton Library. Approximately 250 books were collected! The 1902-03 college bulletin stated that the library held 1,500 volumes. By 1905 the library held 2,500 volumes. In 1975 the library held 121,500 volumes. (King, The Dick Smith Library: Into the Second Century, 2002). Currently the library has over 280,000 items!

Film Buffs, Unite!


The 39th Annual USA Film Festival in Dallas began yesterday and runs through Sunday, May 3rd. Catch first runs of movies (Management, The Maiden Heist, Is Anybody There?) that won't be released nationwide for months to come. Also featured are tributes to Ray Liotta, Brian Cox, and Juanita Moore. Tickets are $10 for each program. Get ticket information by contacting the USA Film Festival at (214) 821-6300. PDF of full schedule.

FILM RESOURCES @ DICK SMITH LIBRARY:

BOOKS AVAILABLE FOR CHECKOUT:

PN1995.9.P7 G4
Film makers on film making statements on their art by thirty directors
Geduld, Harry M.

TR852.D3
Introduction to film making.
Davis, Robert E

PN1995.9 .A26 H33 2003 EB
Acting for film [electronic resource].
Haase, Cathy.

PN1995.9 .M56 B46 2009
America on film : representing race, class, gender, and sexuality at the movies 2nd ed.
Benshoff, Harry M.

PN1995.9 .T47 G73 2008
State fare : --an irreverent guide to Texas movies.
Graham, Don.

REFERENCE BOOKS:

PN1998.2 .T49 2002
The new biographical dictionary of film 4th ed.
Thomson, David, 1941-

PN1993.5.U6 H55 1990 V.4
History of the American cinema
Harpole, Charles Henry.

PN1993.5.A1 C56 2000
Cinema year by year, 1894-2000 American ed.
Karney, Robyn.

DVD/VHS:

PN1995.9.T47 T4 1986 PT.1
Texas in film [videorecording]
Graham, Don.

PN1995.9.W3 A45 2003
All quiet on the western front [videorecording] Full frame version.
Laemmle, Carl, 1908-1979.

PN1997 .D6 1994
Do the right thing [videorecording]

Lee, Spike. 1957

PN1997 .J353 2007
Jazz singer
Three-disc deluxe ed.; 80th anniversary ed.(Motion picture : 1927)
Crosland, Alan, 1894-1936


PN1997 .T39 1999
Taxi driver [videorecording] Collector's ed.
Phillips, Michael.

JOURNALS:

Camera obscura, Entertainment Weekly, Film comment, Film history, Film & history, Fim International, film literature index, Variety, The Hollywood Reporter, American Cinematographer, Cineaste, Studies in Cinema, Bright Lights film journal, Box office, Film journal (and dozens of others).

TO ACCESS JOURNALS: Go to the the library homepage. Under Databases click "Online Periodical By Title" and type in journal title. Click on journal title link, "Info" or "SFX". Log into the NTNET network using your st_ user name and password.

**Don't forget that there are viewing stations downstairs in the Audiovisual Room.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Influenza A (H1N1) virus (aka "Swine Flu")

Tarleton is monitoring this virus - you can check for updates here. A press release from Tarleton's Media Relations office today noted that "swine flu" is a misnomer, particularly since you don't catch the virus from handling pigs or eating pork products.

With finals coming up and summer vacations/jobs approaching, you want to try to avoid getting sick with this or any other illness. The following will help:

- Wash your hands often with soap and (preferably warm) water for 15-20 seconds.
- Use alcohol-based disposable hand wipes or gel cleaners.
- Use tissues to cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
- Don't share drinks with others.
- Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.
- Try to avoid close contact with sick people.

More information:
Tarleton Health Services
Texas Department of State Health Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

10 social media sites for college students

Ok, you all probably already know about and have accounts on Facebook and MySpace. But, did you know that there are a huge number of other social networking sites out there geared toward college students to help you network, collaborate, communicate, and make your daily college tasks a bit easier.

Check out these 10 must try sites put together by David Spinks, a graduating senior in New York.
  • Cramster - Get homework help here by other students and educators.
  • InternshipRatings - Internship reviews from students that have been there.
  • Zimride - Search for rideshares.
  • Box.net - Secure online file server.
  • Twitter: @heatherhuhman - Tweets helpful information to those seeking internships and entry level jobs. @collegebloggers - Connects college students, faculty, and alumni bloggers, sharing relevant content.@careerealism - Career experts tweet career advice in response to questions sent in by readers.@sweetcareers - Great tips for college students and job seekers.@findinternships - Informative resource for those looking for internships.
  • Remember the Milk - Convenient place to manage your daily tasks.
  • Gradefund - Earn money for your good grades.
  • Evernote - Cool tool that allows you to capture information and access it later, from any computer.
  • Zumeo - Job search/online resume site.
  • CampusBooks - Buy, sell or donate your textbooks.

Top Ten Tuesday – Twitter DOs and DON'Ts

I like all the cool new technology and toys that seem to pop up over night! It is so much fun to play and learn about this stuff. Twitter is my new favorite. Do you twitter? Do you have lots of followers? Many celebrities, television programs, and news organizations have over 1 million followers each! Check out the Top 100 Twitterholics with the most followers at http://twitterholic.com/. I wanted to share these Twitter DOs and DON'Ts. You can find more tips about Twitter from PC Magazine.
  • Don't say anything that could get you fired or prevent you from getting a job. Tweets are public and are open to everyone.
  • Do shrink your URLs – this makes it easier to follow your links.
  • Don't be boring. A simple rule - "Never tweet about food or the weather."
  • Do categorize your tweets for added visibility.
  • Don't tweet more than ten times a day, or more than five times an hour. If you have that much to say, maybe it belongs on a blog.
  • Do share pictures. Don't tell us about something cool or life-changing without a link or picture.
  • Don't reply to every single tweet. That will get old fast.
  • Do make Twitter useful - follow the news.
  • Don't tweet drunk - You will regret your tweets in the morning.
  • Do promote yourself - your work, your school, etc.
  • Don't ignore people who send you a direct message or a reply. Part of the fun is conversing with your followers.
Try Twitter! It really is fun.

Friday, April 24, 2009

Ever Wonder How To?

Since finals are starting next week, you need some ideas for productive procrastination. May I suggest Have you ever wondered how to...

Drive cats endlessly crazy?
Bellydance?
Create and animate a stop motion LEGO brickfilm?
Break in 8 ball and 9 ball?
Make a compressed air spit ball launcher?
Avoid fretbuzz on an electric guitar?
Stop procrastinating? (ok ok, time to get back to studying.)

GOOD LUCK ON THOSE FINALS!!!

Happy (late) birthday, Shakespeare!



William Shakespeare was born on April 23, 1564--yesterday would have been his 445th birthday. But it's not too late to celebrate.
Some of Shakespeare's most famous quotations about age:
“I would there were no age between ten and three-and-twenty, or that youth would sleep out the rest; for there is nothing in the between but getting wenches with child, wronging the ancientry, stealing, fighting.” The Winter's Tale
"Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale her infinite variety." Anthony and Cleopatra.
"With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come." The Merchant of Venice
"I have lived long enough. My way of life is to fall into the sere, the yellow leaf, and that which should accompany old age, as honor, love, obedience, troops of friends I must not look to have." Macbeth
Shakespeare @ Dick Smith Library:

Here is a small sampling of some of our resources:

Reference Books

PR2892 .O56 2002 Boyce, Charles. Shakespeare A to Z : the essential reference to his plays, his poems, his life and times, and more.
PR2892.B69 1990 Davis, J. Madison. The Shakespeare name dictionary.
PR2892 .D33 2004. Palmer, Alan Warwick.Who's who in Shakespeare's England.
JOURNALS: Shakespeare, The Shakespeare Association bulletin, Shakespeare bulletin, Shakespeare in Southern Africa, Shakespeare on film newsletter, Shakespeare quarterly,Shakespeare studies, Shakespeare survey
TO ACCESS JOURNALS: Go to the the library homepage. Under Databases click "Online Periodical By Title" and type in journal title. Click on journal title link, "Info" or "SFX".
Log into the NTNET network using your st_ user name and password.

FILM VERSIONS OF THE PLAYS(VHS):
Our selection includes: Coriolanus, Cymbeline, Henry V, Henry VIII, King Lear, Love's Labours Lost,Macbeth,Measure for Measure,Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello, Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Romeo and Juliet, The Taming of the Shrew, The Tragedy of Richard III, The Two Gentleman of Verona, The Tempest, The Winter's Tale.

There are viewing and listening stations available downstairs for various formats, including DVDs, CDs, records, VHS and cassettes.
SHAKESPEARE IN THE NEWS
"Portrait of Shakespeare Unveiled, 399 Years Late." Mackey, Robert. The Lede Blog. The New York Times. March 9, 2009.
"Remains of Shakespeare's First Globe Theatre unearthed." Smith, Graham. Mail Online (The Daily Mail). March 10, 2009.
AREA EVENTS
Scarborough Renaissance Festival (April 4-May 25th, 2009)
For a list of other Texas Renaissance festivals, go to:
http://www.thebards.net/txrenfaires.shtml
LINKS
On the go? Check out the Open Source Shakespeare Mobile Site and read the Bard's works on your cell phone: http://mobile.opensourceshakespeare.org/
The Texas Shakespeare Festival is located in Kilgore, Texas.More information:
http://www.texasshakespeare.com/

-
Image obtained from Doobybrain.com

Thursday, April 23, 2009

Tarleton Thursdays: Did You Know?











“The most beautiful part of Tarleton’s landscape, trees have remained a landmark throughout the university’s history.”


Arbor Day is tomorrow, April 24. 2009 and trees have always been an important and beautiful part of the campus. As stated in the Tarleton Traditions pamphlet “at least one tree remains from each of the 254 counties in Texas. The largest trees on campus are the post oaks. The two American elms in front of the Howell Building were planted about 1915. The oldest live oak tree is at the southeast corner of the Howell Bulding and a Ness Oak, a hybrid, is east of that building. There are four to six types of native live oaks on campus and many native and grafted pecan trees. The largest pecan tree stands in front of the Agriculture Building.” (Tarleton Traditions, p.31)


Even the library received a tree! In 1956, the Tarleton Scholarship Society planted a tree in front of the new library! However the 1985 addition to the front of the original library building took in that area!

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

The Dick Smith Library needs a slogan!

We're looking for slogans from our users that capture the essence and spirit of the library’s value to the Tarleton community. These slogans will be incorporated into promotional materials (i.e. flyers, brochures, etc.) for the library.

We are holding a Slogan Contest, April 20th - 30th, open to all students, faculty, and staff. Entry forms are available at the Dick Smith Library circulation desk and online @ http://www.tarleton.edu/~library/SloganContest.pdf.

The person with the winning slogan will get receive a copy of The Traditions Remain (a limited edition book about Tarleton history and traditions) currently on display at the library circulation desk.
So... get creative!!

Top Ten Tuesday - 10 Songs for Earth Day

Earth Day was founded back in 1970 and falls on April 22nd each year. To help celebrate, I thought I would share one of my favorite places to find out about music - the Y! Music Playlist. They have created this Top 10 Earth Day songs playlist. Read their blog post to find out more about music and earth day...they have a long history together.  I hope you enjoy.

1. Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology) - Marvin Gaye
2. Big Yellow Taxi - Joni Mitchell
3. Paradise - John Prine
4. Shapes Of Things - The Yardbirds
5. Nature's Way - Spirit
6. Don't Go Near The Water - The Beach Boys
7. If A Tree Falls - Bruce Cockburn
8. Don't Go Near The Water - Johnny Cash
9. Mother Earth (Natural Anthem) - Neil Young
10. I Remember California - R.E.M.

Do you have a favorite environmental song?  Post a comment and share!

Thinking and Living Green!

Earth Day is April 22 & Arbor Day is April 24!

What a great time to consider what we can all do to "live a little greener," which is something many of us long to do. However, it's often hard to find out how to go about doing that.

To meet this information need, Discovery Channel offers Planet Green -- "a global initiative including a television network, interactive tools and 'how-to' resources."

This site offers "solutions-oriented tips and information" we all can use to live greener. Features include "fan sites, articles about how to go green, forums where users can interact," advice from experts, and articles from Discovery Channel's eco-savvy writers. "Passionate, positive, and always practical, Planet Green is bursting with smart tips and inspiring advice."

Discovery Channel also offers a sister site, TreeHugger, which posts "the latest in green news, opinions, interviews, and trends," as well as "the cutting-edge scoop on green architecture, design, gadgets, technology, fashion, health, politics, science, and more."

Check these sites out & go green!

Friday, April 17, 2009

"You are now entering the Stress Free Zone..."

The end of the semester is almost here. Some of you are preparing for graduation. Others may be job-hunting, or getting research projects together for finals. A few of you may be "lucky" enough to be doing all three.

On Monday, April 27, the Dick Smith Library, along with the Student Counseling Center, is hosting The Stress Free Zone from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to help students relax before they dive into final exams.

We'll have fun games outside, a session in the Multi-Purpose Room on how to prepare for finals, a Stress Board in the lobby where students can give each other tips on stress relief, and a multimedia display of items designed to soothe your anxiety.

Stop by and get some stress relief!

We will also be open later for finals: details will be forthcoming on the library homepage.

Don't forget our other resources for "de-stressing":

  • Individual and group study rooms
  • Student lounge
  • Laptop checkout
  • Movies and music
  • Audiobooks
  • Popular novels and magazines
  • Sauve Cafe
If you have any research questions, please call (254) 968-9934 or e-mail us at reference@tarleton.edu.

Thursday, April 16, 2009

Tarleton Thursdays: Did You Know?

Founder's Day
By Frank Chamberlain
Founder’s Day was the first organized tradition to be held at Tarleton. This observance took place on Thanksgiving Day of 1902. Officials decided on this date because it was believed that John Tarleton was born on this approximate date. (The actual day and year of his birth are uncertain.)
The ceremony consisted of a program in the second floor auditorium of the Campus Hall and a processional to Tarleton’s grave that was located in the yard of the building. The grave was covered in flowers and the participants sang the “Founder’s Song” which was specially written for the occasion. This melody was written by faculty member Lillie Pearl Chamberlin and was sung to the tune of “America the Beautiful.” The lyrics of the song gave thanks to John Tarleton and paid tribute to the name and everlasting legacy of the benefactor and his school.
Another notable Founder’s Day was held on April 30th and May 1st of 1949 to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of Tarleton’s establishment. Many alumni and surviving acquaintances of John Tarleton converged on the campus for this semi-centennial reunion. The founder’s day program consisted of tribute speeches and introductions of the distinguished guests. The attendees then paraded to the founder’s gravesite where they laid a wreath and held a moment of silent prayer. The pageant was an especially elaborate program that reenacted the history of the school up until that point with actors portraying John Tarleton, J.C. George, Mary Corn Wilkerson, and many other luminous figures from the past.
Earlier in the year, the name “John Tarleton Agricultural College” was changed to “Tarleton State College.” On the second day of events, Governor Beuford Jester traveled to the campus in order to give a speech and sign the bill that made the name change official.
Cross Timbers Historic Images Project, Tarleton State University Dick Smith Library, http://lib01.tarleton.edu/libimages/collections/tcollection/TAN00004.html
Guthrie, Christopher. John Tarleton and his Legacy: The History of Tarleton State University, 1899-1999. Acton, MA: Tapestry Press, 1999.
Tarleton State University Archives, official programs and itineraries of the event, 1949
This week is Founder's Week at Tarleton. One event, the May Fete, was held Tuesday evening from 6 to 8 in Heritage Park. The Alumni Ambassadors brought back the May Fete tradition in a lovely ceremony with Lord Tarleton presiding, the crowning of the May Queen, along with food and fun! Tonight is the Silver Taps ceremony honoring those in Tarleton's history that have died in the last year. Other events included Vegas Night, Dessert on the Lawn, and concludes with a Block T Party Friday night. The photo above is of the first Founder's Day ceremony.

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Tax Day!

You've got until midnight tonight to e-file or postmark your 2008 federal tax return (or to request an extension)! Many students will be eligible to use the online fast and easy Free File program, if your adjusted gross income is $56,000 or less in 2008.

The Free File program provides free federal (but not state) income tax preparation and electronic filing for eligible taxpayers through a partnership between the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Free File Alliance LLC, a group of private sector tax software companies, including such well-known tax software as TaxACT, TaxCut, and TurboTax.

The "Traditional" Free File is tax software with step-by-step help. Go to the link above and click the button to "Help Me Choose a Company" to find out which software packages you are eligible to use. (Note for question 5 on this page: if you can be claimed as a dependent on your parents' or another person's tax return, you won't be eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit.)

If you don't qualify to use Traditional Free File, you can use Free File Fillable Forms, and fill in the tax forms and file them online without tax software.

All Free File options are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, but it's important to remember that you must access Free File through the IRS website, IRS.gov at the Free File link.

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Top Ten Tuesday - Tax Time! Last Minute Filing Tips

It's Tuesday - that means a list! I had a post ready about National Library Week, but this one might be of more use! With the tax filing deadline close at hand, the IRS offers ten tips for those still working on their tax returns:

  1. File Electronically - Consider filing electronically instead of using paper tax forms. If you file electronically and choose direct deposit, you can receive your refund in as few as 10 days.
  2. Check the Identification Numbers - When filing a paper return carefully check the identification numbers — usually Social Security numbers — for each person listed. This includes you, your spouse, dependents and persons listed in relation to claims for the Child and Dependent Care Credit or Earned Income Tax Credit. Missing, incorrect or illegible Social Security Numbers can delay or reduce a tax refund.
  3. Double-Check Your Figures - If you are filing a paper return, you should double-check that you have correctly figured the refund or balance due.
  4. Check the Tax Tables - If you are filing using the Free File Fillable Forms or a paper return you should double-check that you have used the right figure from the tax table.
  5. Sign your form - Taxpayers must sign and date their returns. Both spouses must sign a joint return, even if only one had income. Anyone paid to prepare a return must also sign it.
  6. Mailing Your Return - Use the coded envelope included with your tax package to mail your return. If you did not receive an envelope, check the section called “Where Do You File?” in the tax instruction booklet.
  7. Mailing a Payment - People sending a payment should make the check out to “United States Treasury” and should enclose it with, but not attach it to the tax return or the Form 1040-V, Payment Voucher, if used. The check should include the taxpayer’s Social Security number, daytime phone number, the tax year and the type of form filed.
  8. Electronic Payments - Electronic payment options are convenient, safe and secure methods for paying taxes. You can authorize an electronic funds withdrawal, or use a credit card or a debit card. For more information on electronic payment options, visit IRS.gov.
  9. Extension to File - By the April due date, taxpayers should either file a return or request an extension of time to file. Remember, the extension of time to file is not an extension of time to pay.
  10. IRS.gov - Forms and publications and helpful information on a variety of tax subjects are available around the clock on the IRS Web site at IRS.gov.

Source: www.irs.gov

Friday, April 10, 2009

Sweet Facts about Easter

Easter is the second most important candy-eating occasion of the year for Americans, who consumed 7 billion pounds of candy in 2001, according to the National Confectioner's Association.

  • Ninety million chocolate Easter bunnies are produced each year.
  • Chocolate bunnies should be eaten ears first, according to 76% of Americans. Five percent said bunnies should be eaten feet first, while 4% favored eating the tail first.
  • Each Easter season, Americans buy more than 700 million Marshmallow Peeps, shaped like chicks, as well as Marshmallow Bunnies and Marshmallow Eggs, making them the most popular non-chocolate Easter candy.
  • Americans consume 16 billion jellybeans at Easter, many of them hidden in baskets.
  • If all the Easter jellybeans were lined end to end, they would circle the globe nearly three times.
  • Jellybeans did not become an Easter tradition until the 1930s. They were probably first made in America by Boston candy maker William Schrafft, who ran advertisements urging people to send jellybeans to soldiers fighting in the Civil War.

    Find out more fun Easter facts at Infoplease.com

Thursday, April 9, 2009




Tarleton’s May Fete

“What would become a treasured tradition began May 5, 1921, when 36 women participated in a May Fete with a wildflower theme and the crowning of a queen. Miss Margaret Bierschwale and Miss Kathleen Blackshear, members of the women’s physical training department, organized and directed the first production. By 1927 Laura Fellman, Director of Physical Training, was in charge of the May Fete.

Each year the May Fete had a different theme. Some of the themes included “Wildflowers”, “The Sun”, and “All Nations”. Decorations and accessories were always very colorful! Highlights of the event included the wrapping of the maypole and the coronation of the May Queen. Next week the Alumni Ambassadors are bringing back the Tarleton May Fete tradition. Be sure to join them next Tuesday, April 14, 2009 for the renewal of the May Fete tradition! And be sure to see their great display about the event in the Dick Smith Library.

Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Top Ten Tuesday - Easter Top Tens

In no particular order, here are ten popular Easter candies:

1. Marshmallow Peeps
2. Chocolate Bunnies
3. Jelly Beans
4. M&M’s – Easter pastels
5. Cadbury Crème Eggs (see photo)
6. malted milk chocolate speckled Robins' Eggs
7. Nestle Crunch Nest Eggs
8. Reese’s Peanut Butter Egg
9. Reester Bunnies
10. Reese's Pieces Carrot

(OK, so I like Reese’s, and this list is entirely made up. That's what happens when you cover for Top Ten Tracy - who is out of town - and discover what you'd planned to post has already been posted, and now it's Wednesday!)

A virtual "Easter egg" is a hidden feature, picture, or sound clip found in nearly all pieces of software. Easter eggs can be a hidden mini game, a funny picture of the development crew, or simply a programmer's name. Easter eggs are also found in DVD movies, so look out for them in the menus. Here are the Top Ten Software Easter Eggs and the Top Ten DVD Easter Eggs.

Monday, April 6, 2009

Want to be serious or silly?

Do you wonder about the veracity of 'truths' that journalists rush to tell us? How do they KNOW this is truth? Says who? To determine fact from fiction, science has developed a system of observation and investigation, and you too can be a scientist, or at least you can be a more critical consumer of science news.

A website that educates the reader on the scientific method is from Exploratorium, the Museum of Science, Art and Human Perception. To help the reader understand the scientific method, Exploratorium folks have developed a project which uses case studies to examine how scientists construct a functional understanding of the world by gathering, assessing, and making use of scientific evidence. Here's your starting place How Do We Know What We Know. Look particularly at the sections 'How Science Works' and 'Can You Believe It' to understand the principles.

On the other hand, it is nearly Easter, and the Chicago Tribune has an annual contest of creating stuff from those marshmallow peeps, Fun with Peeps!

Sunday, April 5, 2009

Tips for Managing Social Media Profiles

If you have several social media profiles (i.e. Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, etc.), you've no doubt discovered how time consuming it is to

  • make sure your pictures and personal info stay current,
  • keep spam deleted,
  • update contact lists, and so on.

To get some tips for efficiently dealing with these tasks, check out Ben Parr’s How To: Manage Multiple Social Media Profiles post on Mashable: The Social Media Guide. He notes that creating consistency in your web presence and keeping content updated and fresh are vital. However, with "a little upfront effort, the task of maintaining multiple profiles can be less tedious, freeing up time to better connect with other people."

In his post, Parr outlines five steps in this process:

  1. Understand your Current Position:
    Find out where you have and don't have profiles using Check User Names,
  2. Choose Your Platforms Realistically:
    Figure out which ones work best for you.
  3. Organize!
    Find a system and stick with it.
  4. Automate and Combine Your Profiles
    Use services such as Ping.fm, Twitterfeed, and Atomkeep to update your profiles.
  5. Keep it Fresh
    Use tools like Shareaholic to make updating content easier.

Thursday, April 2, 2009

Tarleton Thursdays: Did You Know?


Tarleton April Fool's of Years Past!

As shown below, Associate Professor of Business Administration, Mrs. Linnie Smith, had quite a story in the 1953 Tacky-J! Other interesting tidbits also appeared in the special April Fool's edition of the JTAC! What fun to read these stories! Hope you didn't have too many April Fool's jokes played on you yesterday!
























Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Microsoft Word Tips

We go through a LOT of paper and toner here in the Dick Smith Library. It can be frustrating when a large job is previewed before printing, and it shows a single line on the last page.

Did you know there's an easy way to eliminate that problem with Word documents? From within the Print Preview window, click the Shrink to Fit (Word 2003) or Shrink One Page button (Word 2007). Word will tweak the fonts in the document to make it a page smaller. If you don't like the results, just press Ctrl-Z or the Undo arrow (in the top upper left corner) to revert to the previous.

This tip and others come from Eight Handy Tools in Microsoft Word You Probably Don't Know About.